The Evolution of Supply Chain Management

The Evolution of Supply Chain Management

July 26, 2021

One of the many things the pandemic has taught us is how to effectively manage our supply chain to provide essential services to people who need them most. Supply chain management consists of the tight control over the flow of goods and services, between businesses and locations, and includes the movement and storage of raw materials, of work-in-process inventory, and of finished goods as well as end-to-end order fulfillment from point of origin to point of consumption.

The Fedcap Group provides supply chain management in several of our business lines, most visibly in our Total Facilities Management social enterprise where we manage 22MM square feet across an expansive and growing footprint. We have an extensive, top-quality supply chain—small and large companies that have been loyal and valuable partners for decades.

Implementing end-to-end supply chain solutions has historically required skills and capabilities in the following areas:

• Procurement and tracking
• Packaging and warehousing
• Inventory management

Our clients trust us to procure goods competitively and provide supply chain visibility—combining technology, systems, and our day-to-day experience to deliver the promised benefits to end-users. We’ve worked hard to do this well, and we have learned that managing logistics is simply not sufficient.

As in all things, supply chain management is changing. An article by Supply Chain Operations Practice Leader at KPMG, Brian Higgins, highlights the changes we can expect to see in supply chain management.

Customers have almost infinite product choices and near-instant delivery. This notion of customer experience must be a core tenet of your supply chain operating model. In the future, supply chains won’t be driven by products and processes, but by customer needs; they won’t depend on capital-intensive fixed assets and linear flows, but on an ecosystem of modular capabilities, delivered through a network of trusted third parties, that can be scaled and recombined as needs require … new skills will be required, and job roles created.

This is certainly in keeping with what we learned during the pandemic. The customer experience must be at the center of our service delivery model. Even the efficiencies of our service model are not as critical as the customer experience. As the customers’ needs change, so must our services and our service delivery model. We must hire top tier talent savvy enough to predict needs, ensure our supply chain is prepared and, as much as possible, get out ahead of demand. During the pandemic we reshaped our supply chain management, hired top tier talent, leveraged local partnerships, enhanced customer communications, and provided enriched training and staff development opportunities.

As we continue to evolve our supply chain management processes, we’ll look for new ways to understand and measure our customer experience.

As always, I look forward to your comments.

La Evolución del Manejo de la Cadena de Suministro

26 julio 2021

Una de las muchas cosas que la pandemia nos ha enseñado; es cómo manejar eficazmente nuestra cadena de suministro, para proporcionar servicios esenciales a las personas que más los necesitan. El manejo de la cadena de suministro consiste en un estricto control sobre el flujo de bienes y servicios; entre empresas y ubicaciones, e incluye el movimiento y almacenamiento de materias primas, el inventario del trabajo diario y de productos terminados, así como el cumplimiento de pedidos de principio a fin, desde el punto de origen hasta elpunto de consumo.

The Fedcap Group proporciona la gestión de la cadena de suministro en varias de nuestras líneas de negocio; más visiblemente en nuestra empresa social Total Facilities Management; donde hacemos el mantenimiento de 22MM de pies cuadrados a través de una huella expansiva y creciente. Tenemos una cadena de suministro extensa y de alta calidad; con pequeñas y grandes empresas que han sido socios leales y valiosos durante décadas.

La implementación de soluciones de cadena de suministro de principio a fin ha requerido históricamente habilidades y capacidades en las siguientes áreas:

• Adquisiciones y seguimiento
• Embalaje y almacenaje
• Mantenimiento del Inventario

Nuestros clientes confían en nosotros para adquirir bienes de manera competitiva y proporcionar visibilidad de la cadena de suministro combinando: tecnología, sistemas y nuestra experiencia diaria para ofrecer los beneficios prometidos a los consumidores finales. Hemos trabajado duro para hacerlo bien, y hemos aprendido que el manejo de la logística es simple pero no es suficiente.

Como en todas las cosas, el manejo de la cadena de suministro está cambiando. Un artículo del Supply Chain Operations KPMG, Brian Higgins; destaca los cambios que podemos esperar ver en el manejo de la cadena de suministro.

Los clientes tienen opciones de productos casi infinitas y entrega casi instantánea. Esta noción de experiencia del cliente debe ser un principio básico de tu modelo operativo de cadena de suministro. En el futuro, las cadenas de suministro no estarán impulsadas por productos y procesos, sino por las necesidades de los clientes; no dependerán de capital de activos fijos concentrados y flujos lineales, sino de un ecosistema de capacidades modulares, entregadas a través de una red de confianza de terceros, que se pueden escalar y recombinar según lo requieran las necesidades ... se requerirán nuevas habilidades y se crearán roles de trabajo.

Esto sin duda está en consonancia con lo que aprendimos durante la pandemia. La experiencia del consumidor debe estar en el centro de nuestro modelo de prestación de servicios. Incluso la eficacia de nuestro modelo de servicio no es tan crítica como la experiencia del cliente. A medida que cambian las necesidades de los consumidores; también lo deben hacer nuestros servicios y nuestro modelo de prestación de servicios. Debemos contratar a talentos de primer nivel, lo suficientemente expertos como para predecir necesidades; asegurarnos de que nuestra cadena de suministro esté preparada y, en la medida de lo posible, adelantarnos a la demanda. Durante la pandemia remodelamos nuestro manejo de la cadena de suministro, contratamos talento de primer nivel, aprovechamos las asociaciones locales, mejoramos las comunicaciones con los clientes y proporcionamos oportunidades enriquecidas de capacitación y desarrollo del personal.

A medida que continuamos evolucionando nuestros procesos de gestión de la cadena de suministro, buscaremos nuevas formas de comprender y medir la experiencia de nuestros clientes.

Como siempre, espero con interés sus comentarios.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Understanding the Interconnectedness of Societal Problems

Understanding the Interconnectedness of Societal Problems

July 12, 2021

“A problem well put is half solved.”
― John Dewey

I have shared in past posts my commitment to solving problems. That sounds simple, right? After all, that is what social service entities are about. Except that in my experience, that is not what we are about. I do not see the social service environment focused on the complexities of real problem solution. I do however see us serving problems.

What does it mean to serve a problem?

I believe that it means that we accept the premise that a problem exists and that it cannot be eradicated. As a result of this thinking, we layer solutions that actually result in things staying the same. We never really commit to making the problem go away—forever. Why? Because this is very difficult work. It requires that we take the time to fully understand the problem, unpacking its origin, its connection to other systems, and its pathway. And it requires that we make a long-term commitment to changing societal circumstances that allow the problem to germinate and grow.

Consider: According to Child Welfare Information Gateway, over 40% of school-aged children in foster care have educational difficulties. Their high school dropout rates are three times higher than other low-income children. Nationwide, only about half of youth raised in foster care end up finishing high school and less than 10% enter college. This stands in stark comparison to the overall college enrollment rate of 18 to 24-year-olds of 41%. Further, only 3% of youth in care graduate from a four-year college (2019).

As a country we have spent untold millions trying to solve this issue over the past decades, with no measurable change in outcomes. Whatever we are doing is not working. I believe it is because we have not yet fully understood the problem, its origin, its relationship to other systems, and its pathway.

Leyla Acaroglu, a designer, social scientist and entrepreneur, in an article entitled Problem Solving Desperately Needs System Thinking notes “If we really want to start to address the highly complex, often chaotic and incredibly urgent social and environmental issues at play in the world around us, we must overcome the reductionist perspective and build systems that work for all.” She went on to say, “Systems thinking is a way of seeing the world as a series of interconnected and interdependent systems rather than lots of independent parts. As a thinking tool, it seeks to oppose the reductionist view—the idea that a system can be understood by the sum of its isolated parts—and replace it with expansionism, the view that everything is part of a larger whole and that the connections between all elements are critical.”

This perspective makes sense to me. Given the child welfare example, viewing problem solving through the interconnectedness of systems that touch the lives of children and families, we would consider the impact of generational poverty, bias, the structures of the child protective and foster care systems, the interface between the foster care and the educational system … and so on.

Once we understand the layers of systems interconnectedness and how they play out in a child’s life, we have a much better sense of where to start and how to design interventions that chisel away at the actual problem.

12 julio 2021

Comprender la Interconexión de los Problemas Sociales
“Un problema bien planteado está medio resuelto”.
– John Dewey

He compartido en publicaciones anteriores mi compromiso con la resolución de problemas. Eso suena simple, ¿verdad? Después de todo, de eso se tratan las entidades de servicios sociales. Excepto que, en mi experiencia, eso no es de lo que se trata en cuanto a nosotros. No veo que el entorno de servicios sociales se centre en las complejidades de la solución de problemas reales. Sin embargo, veo que estamos sirviendo a los problemas.

¿Qué significa servir a un problema?
Creo que significa que aceptamos la premisa de que un problema existe y que no se puede erradicar. Como resultado de esta creencia, ponemos en capas soluciones que en realidad resultan en que las cosas permanezcan igual. Nunca nos comprometemos realmente a hacer que el problema desaparezca, para siempre. ¿Por qué? Porque es un trabajo muy difícil, requiere que nos tomemos el tiempo para comprender completamente el problema, desempaquetando su origen, su conexión con otros sistemas, y su camino. Y requiere que hagamos un compromiso a largo plazo con las circunstancias sociales cambiantes que permiten que el problema germine y crezca.

Considera: De acuerdo con Child Welfare Information Gateway, más del 40% de los niños en edad escolar en hogares de crianza tienen dificultades educativas. Sus tasas de abandono escolar son tres veces más altas que otras de bajos ingresos de la escuela secundaria. En todo el mundo, sólo alrededor de la mitad de los jóvenes criados en hogares de crianza terminan la escuela secundaria y menos del 10% ingresan a la universidad. Esto se sitúa en una comparación con la tasa general de matriculación universitaria de 18 a 24 años, del 41%. Además, solo el 3% de los jóvenes en cuidado de crianza se gradúan de una universidad de cuatro años (2019).

Como país, hemos gastado incontables millones de dólares tratando de resolver el problema en las últimas décadas, sin un cambio medible en los resultados. Todo lo que estamos haciendo no funciona. Creo que se debe a que todavía no hemos del todo entendido completamente el problema, su origen, su relación con otros sistemas y su camino.
Leyla Acaroglu, tanto diseñadora como científica social así como empresaria; en un artículo titulado Problem Solving Desperately Needs System Thinking , señala que “si realmente queremos comenzar a abordar los problemas sociales y ambientales altamente complejos; a menudo caóticos e increíblemente urgentes en juego en el mundo que nos rodea, debemos superar la perspectiva reduccionista y construir sistemas que funcionen para todos. ” Ella continuó diciendo, “El pensamiento sistémico es una forma de ver el mundo como una serie de sistemas interconectados e interdependientes en lugar de muchas partes por sí solas. Como herramienta de pensamiento; busca oponerse a la visión reduccionista —la idea de que un sistema puede ser entendido por la suma de sus partes aisladas— y reemplazarlo por el expansionismo, la visión de que todo es parte de un todo más grande y que las conexiones son críticas entre todos los elementos”.

Esta perspectiva tiene sentido para mí. Dado el ejemplo del bienestar infantil; viendo la resolución de problemas a través de la interconexión de los sistemas que afectan tanto las vidas de los niños como de las familias; consideraríamos el impacto de la pobreza generacional, el prejuicio, las estructuras de los sistemas de protección infantil y de cuidado de crianza, la interfaz entre el cuidado de crianza y el sistema educativo … y así sucesivamente.

Una vez que entendamos las capas de interconexión del sistema y cómo se desempeñan en la vida de un niño, tendremos un sentido mucho mejor de dónde comenzar y cómo diseñar intervenciones que cincelen el problema real.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

The Courage to Change Course

The Courage to Change Course

July 6, 2021

“Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.”
― Maya Angelou

In the Spring of 2021 McKinsey launched their inaugural American Opportunity Survey that spotlights Americans’ views on economic opportunity, the obstacles they face, and the path ahead to create a more inclusive economy. Combining market-research and opinion-polling, they surveyed 25,000 Americans.

The findings, each worthy of an in-depth discussion include: the impact of the pandemic on optimism, existing inequalities, financial hardship, the barriers to accessing health care and childcare, the fear of rural Americans being left behind, and how gig economy and freelance workers prefer permanent employment.

One of the most interesting findings was that four in ten Americans are either enrolled or interested in pursuing training to advance a career change. Technology and artificial intelligence have significantly altered the very nature of work. This is weighing heavily on the minds of many Americans. People are becoming increasingly aware that reskilling is necessary to meet the qualifications for the jobs that will be available in the coming decades. The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) estimates that 17 million US workers will need to change occupations, or jobs within the same occupation, over the next ten years. This trend disproportionately affects workers of color and those without college degrees. What I found encouraging from the survey was that nearly half of all respondents (49 percent) reported a willingness to change occupations if necessary to meet current and emerging employment demands.

People are expressing courage to step into the unknown to prepare for a future few of us fully understand. The self-doubt around this kind of change can be crippling, particularly for people with barriers. At The Fedcap Group, it is our job to help individuals walk through that fear and get to the other side.

An interesting article in Wharton Magazine written by executive coach Jennifer Chow Bevan advises that every action an individual takes to make a career change helps to quiet self-doubts and effect the desired result. She stresses that while we need to acknowledge people’s fears, we must also ensure that it doesn’t lead to emotional paralysis. We need to help people take the required steps to build their courage “muscle”.

This rings true for me.

The Fedcap Group is committed to helping people achieve long term economic wellbeing. To be effective in this mission, it means that we do several things well. First, we have to ensure that we are offering the right kind of training. Courses that are relevant to the realities of today’s job market. Courses that hold promise for career growth. The trends in technology and automation were the drivers behind our relatively recent combinations with Apex Technical School and Civic Hall—two dynamic organizations committed to elevating people’s skills and marketability.

Next, we have to be present and authentic as we help people face the fears that accompany this new learning and risk taking. This is where we must demonstrate the humanity of our mission. Changing course is never easy, it is fraught with “what ifs” that can be immobilizing. When hiring people to work in our field, we need to recruit individuals who are both caring and competent—who have both intellect and the ability to inspire, those who have patience and can see possibility.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

6 julio 2021

El Coraje de Cambiar el Rumbo

“El coraje es la más importante de todas las virtudes, porque sin valor, no se puede practicar ninguna otra virtud consistentemente”.
– Maya Angelou

En la primavera de 2021, McKinsey lanzó su encuesta inaugural American Opportunity Survey que destacaba las opiniones de los estadounidenses sobre las oportunidades económicas, los obstáculos que enfrentan y el camino a seguir para crear una economía más incluyente. Combinando la investigación de mercado y las encuestas de opinión; encuestaron a 25,000 estadounidenses.

Los hallazgos, cada uno digno de una discusión en profundidad, incluían: el impacto de la pandemia en el optimismo, las desigualdades existentes, las dificultades financieras, las barreras para acceder tanto a la atención médica como al cuidado infantil, el miedo a que los campesinos estadounidenses se quedaran atrás, y así cómo la economía independiente y que los trabajadores temporales preferían el empleo permanente.

Uno de los hallazgos más interesantes, fue que cada cuatro de diez estadounidenses estaban inscritos o interesados en seguir un entrenamiento para avanzar en un cambio de carrera. La tecnología y la inteligencia artificial han alterado significativamente la naturaleza misma del trabajo. Esto está pesando mucho en las mentes de muchos estadounidenses. La gente es cada vez más consciente de que la recapacitación es necesaria para cumplir con las calificaciones para los puestos de trabajo que estarán disponibles en las próximas décadas. El McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) estima que 17 millones de trabajadores estadounidenses necesitarán cambiar de ocupación, o de trabajos dentro de la misma ocupación, en los próximos diez años. Esta tendencia afectará desproporcionadamente a los trabajadores de color y a aquellos sin títulos universitarios. Lo que me pareció alentador de la encuesta fue que casi la mitad de todos los encuestados (49 por ciento) informaron su voluntad de cambiar de ocupación, si es necesario para satisfacer las demandas actuales y emergentes de empleo.

La gente está expresando valor para entrar en lo desconocido para prepararse para un futuro que pocos de nosotros entendemos completamente. El dudar de uno mismo/a en torno a este tipo de cambio puede ser paralizante, particularmente para las personas con cualquier tipo de barreras. En The Fedcap Group, es nuestro trabajo es ayudar a las personas a navegar a través de ese miedo y llegar al otro lado.
Un artículo interesante en Wharton Magazine escrito por la entrenadora ejecutiva Jennifer Chow Bevan; aconseja que cada acción que un individuo tome para hacer un cambio de carrera; ayuda a calmar las dudas de uno mismo/a y producir el resultado deseado. Subraya que si bien tenemos que reconocer los miedos de las personas, también debemos asegurarnos de que no conduzca a una parálisis emocional. Tenemos que ayudar a las personas a tomar las medidas necesarias para construir el “músculo” del valor.

Esto Me Suena Cierto.

The Grupo Fedcap se compromete a ayudar a las personas a lograr el bienestar económico a largo plazo. Para ser eficaces en esta misión; significa que hacemos varias cosas bien. En primer lugar, tenemos que asegurarnos de que ofrecemos el tipo adecuado de capacitación. Cursos que son relevantes para las realidades del mercado laboral actual. Cursos que son prometedores para el crecimiento profesional. Las tendencias en tecnología y automatización fueron las impulsoras detrás de nuestras combinaciones relativamente recientes con Apex Technical School y Civic Hall; dos organizaciones dinámicas comprometidas a elevar las capacidades y la comercialización de las personas.

A continuación, tenemos que estar presentes y ser auténticos mientras ayudamos a las personas tanto a enfrentar los miedos que acompañan a este nuevo aprendizaje como la toma de riesgos. Aquí es donde debemos demostrar la humanidad de nuestra misión. Cambiar de rumbo nunca es fácil, está plagado de “qué pasaría si” que pueden ser paralizantes. Al contratar a personas para trabajar en nuestro campo; necesitamos reclutar a personas que sean a la vez cuidadosos y competentes; que tengan tanto intelecto como la capacidad de inspirar a aquellos que tengan paciencia y puedan ver una posibilidad.

Como siempre, espero sus comentarios.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Do One Thing Differently

Do One Thing Differently

June 28, 2021

“You see, doing one thing differently is very often the same as doing everything differently.”

― Matt Haig, The Midnight Library

I was grocery shopping this morning and I saw that my local market decided to continue some of the practices started during the pandemic. Prior to COVID-19 people would enter and exit from the same doors. Now, we all enter through one door and exit another. This may seem like a small thing, but it certainly is more efficient. It makes finding carts and baskets easier and it improves the flow of traffic in the store—generally a smart idea. Similarly, a local restaurant moved to using technology that allows you to scan and read the menu from your phone, eliminating the use of paper. Most likely this innovation would have come anyway, but the pandemic increased the demand for touchless processes. Further, we all have seen a significant increase in the use of telemedicine―especially for routine questions and ailments. A teleconference allows the doctor to see you with no need to travel when sick, no need to expose others and so on. While this practice was in place prior to the pandemic, it ushered in an exponential increase in the use of telemedicine. These are just a few of the hundreds―if not thousands―of examples of what the pandemic taught us about doing one thing differently.

As we move past the pandemic, many of the CEOs I talk to are institutionalizing practices that they established during the pandemic. Use of technology to reduce travel costs for large meetings, increased staff communications via video, a staff hotline for health and family issues, and so on. Many of us tried something different and had very good results. We focused on solutions and tested new ideas every single day until we found something that worked.

Recently, I have been thinking about not just sustaining good ideas that resulted from the restrictions of the pandemic, but more importantly, maintaining the focus on “doing one thing differently” as a means of problem solving. The pandemic required that we do this―rapidly. As we turn the corner, this approach is no longer required. We should find ways to use it anyway. We need to concretize the process of looking for single points in our procedures that are flawed, and rapidly retool them. As Bill O’Hanlon discusses in his book Do One Thing Different, rather than get caught up in analysis paralysis, do something. Try one small intervention to change an outcome.   

Getting better at what we do has always been a core objective for The Fedcap Group. Given our learning from the pandemic, I intend to ask one very basic question more often: “What is one thing that we can do differently to reduce mistakes, improve efficiencies and outcomes and enhance engagement?” And then I intend to make sure that once leaders test their ideas, they come back and share the results―successful or not―to enhance the learning of our community.

I welcome your thoughts and your “takeaways” from the business lessons learned during the pandemic.

28 junio, 2021

“Ves, hacer una cosa de manera diferente es muy a menudo lo mismo que hacer todo de manera diferente”.

― Matt Haig, The Midnight Library

Estaba comprando comestibles esta mañana y vi que mi mercado local decidió continuar con algunas de las prácticas iniciadas durante la pandemia. Las personas que entraban y salían por las mismas puertas. Ahora, todos entramos por una puerta y salimos por la otra. Esto puede parecer una cosa pequeña, pero sin duda es más eficiente. Hace que encontremos tanto los carritos como las cestas de supermercado más fácilmente y que mejora el flujo de tráfico en la tienda; generalmente es una idea inteligente. Del mismo modo, un restaurante de mi localidad comenzó a utilizar una tecnología que le permite escanear y leer el menú desde tu teléfono móvil, eliminando el uso de papel. Lo más probable es que esta innovación nos hubiera llegado de todos modos; pero la pandemia aumentó la demanda de procesos sin contacto. Además, todos hemos visto un aumento significativo en el uso de la telemedicina, especialmente para dudas y padecimientos. Una teleconferencia permite al médico verte, sin necesidad de viajar cuando estés enfermo/a, y sin necesidad de exponer a los demás y así sucesivamente. Si bien esta práctica se llevaba a cabo antes de la pandemia; marcó el comienzo de un aumento potencial en el uso de la telemedicina. Estos son solo algunos de los cientos; si no miles de ejemplos de lo que la pandemia nos enseñó sobre cómo hacer una cosa diferentemente.

A medida que superamos la pandemia, muchos de los Presidentes Ejecutivos con los que he estado hablando; están institucionalizando prácticas que establecieron durante la pandemia. Como el uso de la tecnología, para reducir los costos de viaje para grandes juntas, el aumento de las comunicaciones con el personal a través del video, una línea telefónica directa del personal para tanto para asuntos de salud como de la familia, etc. Muchos de nosotros tratamos algo diferente y tuvimos muy buenos resultados. Nos centramos en soluciones y probamos nuevas ideas todos los días hasta que encontramos algo que funcionó.

Recientemente, he estado pensando no solo en mantener las buenas ideas que resultaron a causa de las restricciones de la pandemia, sino, lo que es más importante, mantener el enfoque en “hacer una cosa diferentemente” como un medio para resolver problemas. La pandemia requería que lo hiciéramos rápidamente. En cuanto damos vuelta de hoja; este enfoque ya no es necesario. Deberíamos encontrar maneras de usarlo de todos modos. Necesitamos concretar el proceso de buscar objetivos únicos en nuestros procesos que son defectuosos, y reestructurarlos rápidamente. Como Bill O’Hanlon lo discute en su libro “Do one Thing Differently”; en lugar de quedar atrapado en la parálisis del análisis, hacer algo. Prueba un pequeño procedimiento para cambiar un resultado.   

Mejorar en lo que hacemos; siempre ha sido un objetivo central para The Fedcap Group. Debido a nuestro aprendizaje de la pandemia; tengo la intención de hacerme una pregunta muy básica más a menudo; ¿Cuál sería una cosa que pudiéramos hacer de manera diferente para reducir las equivocaciones, mejorar la eficiencia y los resultados y realzar el compromiso?  “Y luego tengo planeado el asegurarme de que una vez que los líderes, hayan probado sus ideas; regresen y me compartan los resultados; exitosos o no; para mejorar con ello, el aprendizaje de nuestra comunidad.

Agradezco tus consejos y tus “conclusiones” de las lecciones empresariales aprendidas durante la pandemia.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Technology: A Tool for Managing Employee Health

Technology: A Tool for Managing Employee Health

June 21, 2021

Recently, Plante Moran – one of the largest audit and wealth management firms in the United States – surveyed nonprofit leaders about the impact of COVID 19 on 2021 priorities and future planning. I found the responses to the survey mirrored some of our own thinking about how to better use technology to improve all aspects of operations.

In the survey, sixty-seven percent of respondents said their top technology priority is improving performance of existing systems, closely followed by mitigating cybersecurity risks, systems integration, and improving their social media and online presence. 

Most respondents discussed the need to leverage technology to:

  • Meet the needs of customers.
  • Track and analyze impact/outcomes to improve program performance.
  • Enhance donor relations.
  • Improve donations through mobile giving.
  • Provide services remotely.

One thing missing from the responses, something that The Fedcap Group is working on, is smart and effective ways to engage staff in using technology as a tool to improve the overall health of employees.

When the pandemic hit, The Fedcap Group acted rapidly. We established a Command Center and a staff hotline. We leveraged our Oracle system to create a safe and protected place where staff could discuss health concerns, ask questions, and/or simply share the stressors that COVID was having on their lives. While the work of the Command Center was remarkable, only a limited number of staff accessed the Oracle platform. More recently, we asked staff, via Oracle, if they are or plan to be vaccinated. This information would help us plan for staff moving back to their offices. Even with a great deal of encouragement, this too has been only moderately successful. 

I was curious as to why we were experiencing such a limited use of technology around employee health, so I spent a considerable amount of time checking in with staff to better understand some of the barriers we are facing. In my conversations, I learned several things:

  1. The user interface has to be simple and intuitive. The system cannot be challenging to use, if it is, staff will not take the time.
  2. Staff need to feel their very personal information will be protected. While some share personal information on Facebook for hundreds of friends to see, the workplace is a different story. We need to understand and appreciate this reluctance and reinforce in our communications how health care information is secure.
  3. Staff need to understand why we want the information. They are asking how we will use the aggregate information to improve the organization.
  4. The politicization of COVID impacted people’s response.

For the most part, these staff concerns are logical and expected. We have spent a great deal of time training staff on the benefits of technology in serving our clients and made great strides in becoming a data-driven organization. We use information to improve our services and to inspire service innovations. We have not however, spent the same amount of time helping staff understand how technology can be an effective tool to enhance the overall health of our employees. And we have not yet demonstrated on a consistent basis, how the health of our employees contributes to a more effective, successful organization.  

This is one of the priorities of The Fedcap Group in 2021. 

How are you engaging staff in conversations about technology and employee health? What strategies have been most effective to engage employees in online health/well-being discussions?  

As always, I welcome your thoughts!

21 Junio, 2021

Recientemente, Plante Moran -una de las firmas de auditoría y gestión de patrimonios más grande de los Estados Unidos- encuestó a líderes sin fines de lucro acerca del impacto del COVID 19 en las prioridades del 2021 y la planificación futura. Encontré que las respuestas a la encuesta reflejaban parte de nuestro propio criterio; sobre cómo usar mejor la tecnología para mejorar todos los aspectos de las operaciones.

En la encuesta, el sesenta y siete por ciento de los encuestados dijo que su principal prioridad tecnológica es mejorar el rendimiento de los sistemas existentes, seguido de cerca por la mitigación de los riesgos de ciberseguridad, la integración de sistemas y el mejoramiento tanto de sus redes sociales como de su presencia en línea. 

La mayoría de los encuestados hablaron de la necesidad de aprovechar la tecnología para:

  • Satisfacer las necesidades de los clientes.
  • Realizar un seguimiento y analizar el impacto y los resultados, para mejorar el rendimiento del programa.
  • Intensificar las relaciones con los donantes.
  • Mejorar las donaciones a través de donaciones con tecnologías móviles.
  • Proporcionar servicios de forma remota.

Una cosa que faltaba en las respuestas; algo en lo que The Fedcap Group está trabajando, son formas inteligentes y efectivas de involucrar al personal en el uso de la tecnología; como una herramienta para mejorar la salud general de los empleados.

Cuando llegó la pandemia, The Fedcap Group actuó rápidamente. Establecimos un Centro de Comando y una línea directa para el personal. Aprovechamos nuestro sistema Oracle para crear un lugar seguro y protegido donde el personal pudiera discutir problemas de salud, hacer preguntas o simplemente compartir los factores de estrés que covid estaba teniendo en sus vidas. Si bien el trabajo del Centro de Comando fue notable, solo un número limitado de personal accedió a la plataforma Oracle. Más recientemente, preguntamos al personal, a través de Oracle, si estaban o planeaban vacunarse. Esta información nos ayudaría a planificar el regreso del personal a sus oficinas. Incluso con mucho aliento, esto también ha tenido un éxito moderado. 

Tenía curiosidad por saber por qué estábamos experimentando un uso tan limitado de la tecnología en torno a la salud de los empleados, así que pasé una cantidad considerable de tiempo verificando con el personal para comprender mejor algunas de las barreras que enfrentábamos. En mis conversaciones, aprendí varias cosas:

  1. La conexión de usuario tiene que ser simple e intuitiva. El sistema no puede ser difícil de usar, si lo es, el personal no le dedicará el tiempo.
  2. El personal necesita sentir que su información personal estará protegida. Si bien algunos comparten información personal en Facebook para que cientos de amigos la vean, el lugar de trabajo es una historia diferente. Necesitamos entender y apreciar esta desconfianza y reforzar en nuestras comunicaciones; de cómo la información de atención médica es segura.
  3. El personal necesita entender por qué queremos la información. Se preguntan cómo usaremos la información agregada para mejorar la organización.
  4. La politización del COVID impactó en la respuesta de las personas.

En su mayor parte, estas preocupaciones del personal son lógicas y esperadas. Hemos pasado muchísimo tiempo capacitando al personal sobre los beneficios de la tecnología, en el servicio a nuestros clientes y hemos hecho grandes avances para convertirnos en una organización basada en datos. Utilizamos la información tanto para mejorar nuestros servicios como para inspirar innovaciones de los mismos. Sin embargo, no hemos pasado la misma cantidad de tiempo ayudando al personal a comprender cómo la tecnología puede ser una herramienta efectiva para mejorar la salud general de nuestros empleados. Y aún no hemos demostrado de manera consistente; cómo la salud de nuestros empleados contribuye a una organización más efectiva y exitosa.  

Esta es una de las prioridades del Fedcap Group en 2021. 

¿Cómo estás involucrando al personal en conversaciones acerca de la tecnología y la salud de los empleados? ¿Qué estrategias han sido más efectivas para involucrar a los empleados en conversaciones en línea sobre la salud y el bienestar?  

Como siempre, ¡agradezco tus opiniones!

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

My Friend Herb Sturz

My Friend Herb Sturz

June 14, 2021

This week an icon left us and with his passing, the lights in New York City are a little less bright.

Herb was a giant with a big brain, a huge heart and tremendous passion for fairness and justice. Simply put, he saw wrongs and tried to right them. His genuineness and depth of character caused people around him to listen to what he had to say. He was the force behind significant social reform in New York City—but chose to work behind the scenes. He was too smart to believe that only one person had all of the answers, so he found creative ways to bring people together to solve problems– a pied piper of sorts who brought us all along to make the world more just.

Early in my tenure as the CEO of the Fedcap Group, I was introduced to Herb by Carol Kellerman, then President of the Citizens Budget Commission. This meeting changed the course of my work and our organization. It also changed me.

Herb mentored me—why he chose me I will never know, but I will be eternally grateful. He challenged ideas and asked me some of the smartest, most astute questions I have ever been asked. He helped me refine goals and think strategically. He taught me the art of planning important, system-changing advances, by practicing patience and taking incremental, tactical steps. He was the epitome of being “better together” and it was magical to watch him in action. He told me when I was doing a good job and maybe more importantly, when I wasn’t.

Herb was also my dear friend. Many Sunday mornings we went to breakfast, and I laughed until it hurt, as he shared his many remarkable stories. As was his way, he captivated people around him, including wait staff and people passing by our table, with his charm and wit. He had a twinkle in his eye that I will forever remember.

Over the past year or so, as his body was slowing down, his mind was ever on alert, looking for connections and opportunities to make a difference—doing this mattered to Herb.

How privileged we were to have this legend, who was at the same time such a lovely human being, walk among us for 90 years.

The Fedcap Group created this video to honor Herb and his many contributions to New York City. I hope you enjoy it.

Goodbye my dear friend, I will miss you.

14 junio 2021

Mi Querido Amigo Herb Sturz

Esta semana nos dejó un icono y con su fallecimiento, las luces en la ciudad de Nueva York están un poco menos brillantes.

Herb era un gigante con una gran mente, un gran corazón y una tremenda pasión por la equidad y la justicia. En pocas palabras, vio errores y trató de corregirlos. Su autenticidad y profundidad de carácter hicieron que la gente a su alrededor escuchara lo que tenía que decir. Él fue la fuerza detrás de una reforma social significativa en la ciudad de Nueva York, pero decidió trabajar detrás de bambalinas. Era demasiado inteligente para creer que sólo una persona tenía todas las respuestas, así que encontró formas creativas de reunir a la gente para resolver problemas, un especie de flautista que nos atrajo como imán todo el tiempo para hacer que el mundo fuera más justo.

Al principio de mi mandato como Presidenta Ejecutiva del Grupo Fedcap, Carol Kellerman, entonces Presidenta de Citizens Budget Commission, me presentó a Herb. Esta reunión cambió el curso de mi trabajo y de nuestra organización. Así como También me cambió a mí.
Herb me asesoró—por qué me eligió a mí, yo nunca lo sabré—, pero estaré eternamente agradecida. Desafió las ideas y me hizo algunas de las preguntas más inteligentes y astutas que nunca me habían hecho. Me ayudó a refinar metas y pensar estratégicamente. Me enseñó el arte de planificar avances importantes que cambiaran el sistema; practicando la paciencia y tomando pasos tácticos progresivamente. Él era la personificación de estar “mejor juntos” y era mágico verlo en acción. Me decía cuando estaba haciendo un buen trabajo y tal vez lo más importante era, cuando me decía que no lo estaba haciendo.
Herb también era mi muy querido amigo. Muchos domingos por la mañana íbamos a desayunar, y me reía con él hasta que me dolía, ya que compartía muchas de sus extraordinarias historias. Tal cual era su manera; él cautivó a la gente a su alrededor, incluyendo el personal del restaurante y a las personas que pasaban por nuestra mesa con su encanto e ingenio. Tenía un brillo en sus ojos que recordaré para siempre.

Durante el último año más o menos, a medida que su cuerpo decaía, su mente estaba siempre en alerta, buscando contactos y oportunidades para hacer la diferencia, hacer esto era lo que le importaba a Herb.
Qué privilegiados fuimos todos nosotros de tener a esta leyenda; que fue al mismo tiempo un ser humano tan encantador; caminar entre nosotros durante 90 años.

The Grupo Fedcap hizo este video para honrar a Herb y a sus muchas contribuciones a la ciudad de Nueva York. Espero que lo disfrutes.

Hasta pronto mi querido amigo, te echaré de menos.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Is Our Thinking Evolving?

Is Our Thinking Evolving?

June 7, 2021

“When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking.” – Arthur Conan Doyle

It is summer and I am eager to get back to biking.

I love to bike. I always have. I have owned many different types of bikes and love mountain bikes, street bikes, cross country … and over the years, like most relatively serious bikers, I have fine-tuned my riding experience—almost.

I thoroughly enjoy the feeling of freedom that comes with biking. I enjoy the scenery, the sense of adventure, and I even enjoy the hills—both directions! And when I have completed a good ride, I love the feeling of accomplishment.

But the part that I may love most about biking is the planning for the next trip. I love the detail involved in every aspect and each phase of the planning. I have developed a checklist and I go through that list –in meticulous detail—building on my knowledge from previous trips.

Was my tire pressure appropriate to begin the trip? Did I keep it right for each phase of the trip? Did I carry the right amount of water? Food? Did I plan my breaks right? Was the trip too long? Too short? Did I carry the right gear? Do I need new gear? Did I carry the right equipment? Can I lessen the weight in any part of my bike without compromising the trip? Each trip feeds my knowledge base and thus, my planning. And no matter how long I have biked, I continue to learn and hone each biking experience.

And for those who bike with me, I make sure that they plan too. I learned this the hard way!

I am not sure where this focus on detail came from, but it drives me, possibly to a fault! Those with whom I work side by side know this. Every experience that I have had professionally feeds the next experience. Each interview with a prospective candidate drives the next interview. Every program launch informs the next launch. Every new acquisition is informed by past acquisitions. Every experience improves the quality of my planning and the depth and types of the questions I ask as I prepare.

Because I document my planning process, I have a history of how I have prepared for my many bike trips. Recently, I spent some time looking back over my journals and was struck by the difference in the questions I asked from my fledgling years as a biker to today. I was struck by the shift in how I planned and the way I organized. It was interesting to see the way my thinking about biking evolved and how this evolution impacted how I planned and executed each trip.

While I am not one that uses a lot of metaphors, I do think that there is a message here that should not be lost. People who want to improve evolve in how they approach a task. I look for evolution in thinking when I hire potential executives in the company. I look for individuals who have a process that they follow to improve how they solve problems and plan for the known and the unknown. And I spend a lot of time during the interview seeking to understand how their process has evolved. Because … evolution in thinking matters!

Someone asked me once in an interview and the question has always stuck with me:

Do you have 25 years of experience or do you have one year of experience that you repeated 25 times?” In other words, did you evolve?

As always, I welcome your thoughts!

7 junio 2021

¿Está Evolucionando Nuestro Pensamiento?

“Cuando los ánimos están por los suelos, cuando el día parece negro, cuando el trabajo se vuelve monótono, cuando la esperanza apenas tenerla parece valer la pena , basta con montar una bicicleta y salir a dar una vuelta calle abajo, sin pensar en nada más que en el paseo que se está dando.” – Arthur Conan Doyle

Es verano y estoy ansiosa por volver a montar en bicicleta.

Me encanta andar en bicicleta. Siempre lo he hecho. He tenido muchos tipos diferentes de bicicletas y me encantan las bicicletas de montaña, las bicicletas para la ciudad, y las de todo terreno … y a lo largo de los años; como la mayoría de los ciclistas relativamente serios, casi, he afinado mi experiencia de andar en bicicleta así.

Disfruto muchísimo la sensación de libertad que me da el ciclismo. Disfruto del paisaje, el sentido de la aventura, e incluso disfruto de las colinas, ¡en ambas direcciones! Y cuando he completado un buen viaje en ella, me encanta la sensación de logro.

Pero la parte que más puede gustarme de andar en bicicleta; es la planificación para el próximo viaje. Me encanta el detalle involucrado en cada aspecto y en cada fase de la planificación. He fabricado una lista de verificación y voy a través de esa lista -con meticuloso detalle – basándome en mis conocimientos de viajes anteriores.

¿era la presión del aire de mis neumáticos apropiada, para comenzar el viaje? ¿Lo mantuve apropiado para cada fase del viaje? ¿Llevé la cantidad correcta de agua? ¿víveres? ¿Planeé bien mis descansos? ¿Fue el viaje demasiado largo? ¿Demasiado corto? ¿Llevé las herramientas adecuadas? ¿Necesito equipo nuevo? ¿Llevé el equipo adecuado? ¿Puedo disminuir el peso en cualquier parte de mi bicicleta sin poner en peligro el viaje? Cada viaje alimenta mi base de conocimientos y, por lo tanto, mi planificación. Y no importa cuánto tiempo haya montado en bicicleta, sigo aprendiendo y perfeccionando cada experiencia de ciclismo.

Y para aquellos que montan en bicicleta conmigo, me aseguro de que también planifiquen. Aprendí esto, de la forma más dura!

No estoy segura de dónde viene este enfoque en el detalle, pero me lleva, posiblemente a una culpa! Aquellos con los que trabajo codo a codo lo saben. Cada experiencia que he tenido profesionalmente alimenta la siguiente. Cada entrevista con un candidato potencial impulsa la siguiente entrevista. Cada programa lanzado, informa el próximo lanzamiento. Cada nueva adquisición se basa en adquisiciones anteriores. Cada experiencia mejora la calidad de mi planificación y la profundidad y los tipos de las preguntas que me hago mientras me preparo.

Debido a que documento mi proceso de planificación, tengo un historial de cómo me he preparado para mis muchos viajes en bicicleta. Recientemente, pasé algún tiempo rememorando en mis diarios y me llamó la atención la diferencia en las preguntas que me hice desde mis años novatos como ciclista hasta hoy. Me llamó la atención el cambio en la forma en que planeé y la manera en la que me organicé. Me pareció interesante ver la forma en que evolucionó mi pensamiento sobre el ciclismo y cómo esta evolución impactó en la manera cómo planeé y ejecuté cada viaje.

Si bien no soy de las que utilizan muchas metáforas, creo que hay un mensaje aquí que no debe perderse. Las personas que quieren mejorar evolucionan en la forma en que abordan una tarea. Busco la evolución de pensamiento cuando contrato a ejecutivos potenciales en la organización. Busco individuos que tengan un proceso que sigan, para mejorar la forma en que resuelven problemas y planifican tanto para lo conocido como para lo desconocido. Y paso mucho tiempo durante la entrevista tratando de entender cómo ha evolucionado su proceso. ¡Porque … la evolución en el pensamiento importa!

Alguien me preguntó una vez en una entrevista y la pregunta siempre se me ha quedado grabada:

“¿Tienes 25 años de experiencia o tienes un año de experiencia que se ha repetido 25 veces? ” En otras palabras, ¿evolucionaste?

!Como siempre, agradezco tus comentarios!

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Reflection and Action

Reflection and Action

May 28, 2021

As we spend this weekend remembering our veterans—I have asked Retired Army Colonel David Sutherland to serve as a guest blogger today. We are grateful for his service to this country—and his leadership on and off the battlefield.

By Retired Army Colonel David W. Sutherland, Chairman, Dixon Center for Military and Veterans Services– a member organization of The Fedcap Group

If ye break faith with us who die” John McCrae, 1915

This weekend marks Memorial Day, a sacred day of recognition in the United States. At Dixon Center for Military and Veterans Services, we will spend the weekend remembering, honoring, and mourning the United States military members who died while serving in the Armed Forces – some of whom we served with over the course of our military service.

One of history’s most famous wartime poems, In Flanders Fields, written in 1915 during the First World War by Canadian officer and surgeon John McCrae, provides a moment to reflect.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

As a child, my father, Dr. G. W. Sutherland, a Canadian Army Veteran, would share his interpretation of the poem with me. He believed that the last stanza was written to inspire those reading this poem to reflect on the achievements and the sacrifices of our nation’s fallen and to never forget them or their families.

We are reminded that the worst thing we can do is to forget. We can all use the opportunity created by Memorial Day to remember those who died while serving, be it in combat, during training exercises, or through accidents and non-combat related deaths.

The narratives of those who have fallen live on through their families. These families are given the honorific “Gold Star” to designate that they have had a loved one lose his/her life in service to the nation. If you know a Gold Star family, reach out to check on them this weekend and provide encouragement. If you meet a Gold Star family member in the future, ask them to share their story, then take the time to listen.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic may alter our ability to honor the fallen with parades or memorial services, it does provide an opportunity for us to create our own personal remembrances. Consider the following activities this weekend:

    • Plant a remembrance tree or flowers with your family
    • Research the achievements of one of our fallen from previous wars and ongoing combat operations
    • Livestream virtual events from memorials, Arlington National Cemetery, and local ceremonies.

 

This Memorial Day weekend, I hope that you take a moment to personally reflect on the achievements and courage of our U.S. service members who died while serving in the Armed Forces.

At Dixon Center, we will always remember, and they will never be forgotten.

28 mayo 2021

Reflexión y Acción

Mientras pasamos este fin de semana recordando a nuestros veteranos, le he pedido al coronel retirado del ejército David Sutherland que sirva como “bloguero” invitado hoy. Estamos agradecidos por su servicio a este país, y su liderazgo dentro y fuera del campo de batalla.
Por el Coronel Retirado del Ejército David W. Sutherland, Presidente del Dixon Center for Military and Veterans Services – una organización miembro del Fedcap Group.

“If ye break faith with us who die ” John McCrae, 1915

Este fin de semana se celebra el Día de los Veteranos, un día sagrado de reconocimiento en los Estados Unidos. En Dixon Center for Military and Veterans Services, pasaremos el fin de semana recordando, honrando y guardando luto a los militares de los Estados Unidos que murieron mientras servían en las Fuerzas Armadas; algunos de los cuales con los que servimos en el transcurso de nuestro servicio militar.

Uno de los poemas bélicos más famosos de la historia, In Flanders Fields, escrito en 1915 durante la Primera Guerra Mundial por el oficial y cirujano canadiense John McCrae, ofrece un momento para reflexionar.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

De niño, mi padre, el Dr. G. W. Sutherland, un veterano del ejército canadiense, compartió conmigo su interpretación del poema. Él creía que la última estrofa estaba escrita para inspirar a aquellos que leían este poema; a reflexionar sobre los logros y los sacrificios de nuestros caídos y a nunca olvidarles tanto a ellos como a sus familias.

Se nos recuerda que lo peor que podemos hacer es olvidar. Todos podemos aprovechar la oportunidad creada por el Día de los Veteranos para recordar a aquellos que murieron mientras servían; ya fuera en combate, durante ejercicios de entrenamiento o a través de accidentes y muertes no relacionadas con el combate.

La narrativa de aquellos que han caído vive a través de sus familias. A estas familias se les da la honorífica “Estrella de Oro” para destacar que han tenido un ser querido que había perdido su vida al servicio de la nación. Si conoces a una familia de “Estrella de Oro”, ponte en contacto con ella este fin de semana y dale ánimos. Si conoces a un miembro de la familia “Estrella de Oro” en el futuro, pídele que comparta su historia y luego tómate el tiempo para escucharle.

Aunque la pandemia COVID-19 pudiera alterar nuestra capacidad de honrar a los Veteranos con desfiles o servicios conmemorativos; nos brinda la oportunidad de crear nuestros propios recuerdos personales. Considera las siguientes actividades este fin de semana:

    • Planta un árbol o flores de recordación con tu familia.
    • Investiga los logros de uno de nuestros caídos de guerras anteriores, así como de uno en operaciones de combate en curso.
    • Retransmite en vivo eventos virtuales de recordación como: desde el cementerio nacional de Arlington y o desde ceremonias locales.

Este fin de semana del Día de los Veteranos, espero que te tomes un momento para reflexionar personalmente sobre los logros y el coraje de nuestros militares estadounidenses que murieron mientras servían en las Fuerzas Armadas.

En el Dixon Center, siempre los recordaremos, y nunca serán olvidados.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

The Consequence of Focus

The Consequence of Focus

May 24, 2021

As anyone who knows me well can tell you, I am not much of a sports fan, especially golf. I barely understand even the most basic rules. But it was hard not to hear the news of Phil Mickelson—a 50-year-old golfer—leading the PGA over the four days and eventually winning. He beat Las Vegas odds and most followers of golf did not think he would pull it off. Before Mickelson, the oldest person to win a major championship was 48 years old—and that happened in 1968, over half a century ago.

I think what made this remarkable, was not his age, but the absolute focus it took to stay on top for each grueling day of the tournament. Each hole on the course was a new challenge, each hole an opportunity to make a mess or to succeed. Each shot required that he clear the noise and focus—seeing the shot.

We are all faced with more and more reasons to be distracted. And while some of the distractions seem to be adding to our life, they are most often actually undermining our progress. Distractions take us away from what we should be doing and kills our momentum. Clearing the noise is not easy, but imperative if we are to think critically and make sound decisions. It requires a level of focus few know how to achieve. It requires seeing the goal.

The author of an article in Business Insider advises that in order to develop the focus muscle, companies need to select 1 to 3 high priority goals and stick to them. “Focus the entire organization on those goals and continually track results.”

In the same spirit, several years ago Steve Jobs said something that has stuck with me: “Focus is not about saying yes. It is about saying no to the hundred other good ideas that clutter the mind and shift the focus.”

This becomes more true every single day.

Clay Scroggins, in his book How to Lead in a World of Distraction, provides an interesting strategy to clear the noise and stay focused. I think that this too is spot on: Know your why. Find that one sentence that defines why you do the things you do, and it can have massive repercussions on your life moving forward. When you clarify your why—and by that, I mean the answer to every ‘why do you do what you do’ question—you can lead effectively.”

He suggests we ask ourselves four questions: “What are the things I no longer need? What can I afford to get rid of? What are the things keeping me from what matters most? And how can I organize my life so that I know exactly what I’m looking for and I can easily see what matters right away?

Your why becomes the filter through which you can decide what you spend your time on.

As leaders, we need to appreciate in new ways the importance of clearing the noise, staying focused and knowing our why.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts

Wait and See … A Good Leadership Strategy or Not?

Wait and See … A Good Leadership Strategy or Not?

May 17, 2021

The idea of wait and see is considered by some to be a passive approach to leadership. According to a recent article in Entreprenuer.com, “the reactive style of leadership–characterized by a ‘let’s-wait-and-see’ attitude and delayed decision-making–is rarely effective.”

Most of the time I might say the same thing. But over the years, I have come to see the wisdom in certain circumstances of … waiting. That may sound counterintuitive for those who regularly read my blog. You KNOW that I am a staunch advocate of proactive leadership, of understanding the environment in which we operate and positioning our company to be prepared for and even ahead of market trends. That said, when circumstances are unprecedented—such as 9/11 and the pandemic—the instinct to act may be exactly the wrong thing to do.

It takes time following world-changing events to understand the best course of action—or reaction. It takes time to understand what the data is telling us. Sometimes data changes as better questions are asked and answered. Good leaders ensure that they are as well-informed as possible, take steps critical to ensuring safety and solvency, and then as hard as it is, they wait … monitoring the situation to determine the right next step. This seems logical, right? Yet I am seeing responses to the pandemic similar to those I saw in the wake of 9/11. While much changed after 9/11, over time much stayed the same. Many reacted too soon, and as a result made decisions that seemed sound at the time, but in reflection were made without sufficient information.

I discussed this perspective with our leadership team just last week. We responded rapidly to the pandemic, to ensure business continuity and safety. We continued to monitor the information coming from a collection of reliable sources, we communicated regularly with board, staff and stakeholders …and we waited. There are several decisions that I have not made–specifically around mandatory vaccinations and remote work—because the time is just not right. We need more data. It has been interesting to watch how some large companies said that they were moving to a remote work model, only to change their position. Others have said that they were giving up their leases and downsizing their office space, only to change their mind as trends started to shift and more information was available.

Let me be clear—I am not saying do not prepare. I am not suggesting that we simply do nothing. I am suggesting that we delay action while preparing for just about everything. Preparation requires knowledge and scenario-based planning. Using the time to enact “what-if?” scenarios demonstrates the power of patience and observation.

And then, when we do act, our actions should be exceptionally well planned and well-executed. Do the simple things brilliantly—better than most. This kind of smart, “wait and see” leadership will generate confidence throughout the organization and with key stakeholders.

As always, I welcome your thoughts.

17 mayo 2021

Esperar y Ver… ¿Una Buena Estrategia de Liderazgo o No?

La idea de esperar y ver es considerada por algunos como un enfoque pasivo del liderazgo. Según un artículo reciente en “Entreprenuer.com”, “el estilo reactivo de liderazgo, caracterizado por una actitud de ‘esperemos y veamos’ y una toma de decisiones postergada, rara vez es eficaz. “

La mayoría de las veces podría decir lo mismo. Pero a lo largo de los años, he llegado a ver la sabiduría en ciertas circunstancias de … el esperar. Eso puede sonar contradictorio para aquellos que leen regularmente mi “blog”. Tú sabes que soy una firme defensora del liderazgo proactivo, de entender el entorno en el que operamos y posicionar a nuestra organización para estar preparada e incluso ponerla por delante de las tendencias del mercado. Dicho esto, cuando las circunstancias no tienen precedentes—como el “9/11” y la pandemia—el instinto de actuar puede ser exactamente la cosa incorrecta por hacer.

Toma tiempo seguir los eventos cambiantes mundialmente; para comprender el mejor curso de acción – o reacción. Se necesita tiempo para entender lo que los datos están diciéndonos. A veces los datos cambian, a medida que se hacen y se responden mejores preguntas. Los buenos líderes se aseguran de que también estén bien informados tanto como sea posible, tomen medidas críticas para garantizar la seguridad y la solvencia, y luego, por más difícil que sea, esperar… monitoreando la situación para determinar el siguiente paso correcto. Esto parece lógico, ¿verdad?. Sin embargo, estoy viendo respuestas a la pandemia similares a las que vi a raíz del “9/11”. Aunque mucho cambió después del “9/11”; con el tiempo mucho se mantuvo como antes. Muchos reaccionaron demasiado pronto, y como resultado tomaron decisiones que parecían sólidas en ese momento, pero reflexionando; se tomaron sin suficiente información.

Hablé de esta perspectiva con nuestro equipo de liderazgo justamente la semana pasada. Respondimos rápidamente a la pandemia; para garantizar la continuidad de la organización y la seguridad. Continuamos monitoreando la información procedente de una lista de fuentes confiables; nos comunicamos regularmente tanto con la mesa directiva, como con el personal y las partes interesadas … y esperábamos. Hay varias decisiones que no he tomado; específicamente en torno a las vacunas obligatorias y el trabajo a larga distancia; porque el tiempo simplemente no es el adecuado. Necesitamos más datos. Ha sido interesante ver cómo algunas grandes compañías; dijeron que estaban moviéndose a un modelo de trabajo de larga distancia, justo para cambiar su posición. Otras habían dicho que estaban cediendo sus contratos de arrendamiento y reduciendo el espacio de sus oficinas, sólo para cambiar de opinión, a medida que las tendencias comenzaron a cambiar y más información estaba disponible.

Permítanme ser clara— No estoy diciendo que no se preparen. No estoy sugiriendo que simplemente no hagamos nada. Lo que estoy sugiriendo, es que retrasemos la acción, mientras nos preparamos para casi todo. La preparación requiere conocimientos y planificación, basada en escenarios. El uso del tiempo para promulgar el escenario “¿y sí?”; demuestra el poder de la paciencia y la observación.

Y luego, cuando actuamos, nuestras acciones deben ser excepcionales, así como bien planificadas y bien ejecutadas. Hacer las cosas simples brillantemente, mejor que la mayoría. Este tipo de liderazgo inteligente, “esperar y ver”, generará confianza en toda la organización, así como con las partes interesadas cruciales.

Share on

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on pocket

Recent Posts